POLICE Magazine

SEP 2017

Magazine for police and law enforcement

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20 POLICE SEPTEMBER 2017 officer's ability to quickly draw their tool from their belt under stress. Most often in training officers accessing and drawing their tools this way don't struggle with "double dipping." GEAR PLACEMENT Placement of your gear is vital to the drawing of any piece of equipment on your belt. Most often your agency will tell you where you are expected to place each piece of gear on your duty belt, despite your personal preferences. So becoming familiar with your gear is critical, especially in times of duress. A basic rule of thumb when placing your gear on your duty belt is to avoid placing anything directly behind your firearm. You can accomplish this by placing two to three belt keepers behind the firearm to avoid any other piece of gear that may prohibit your ability to draw your firearm from sliding behind it. is is a safety issue that you do not want to test for the first time out in the field. If you need to draw your firearm to protect yourself or someone else, it's imperative that nothing prevent you from ac- cessing it. Knowing where your gear is, and ensuring it is placed in a po- sition you are familiar with, accounts for one-third of the action needed to draw it. MOVEMENT e next third of an effective draw is movement, and this is a must. In most situations when any officer draws gear from their duty belt there is a certain amount of movement needed in concert with the drawing motion. For drawing your firearm, movement to cover is important. "If you do not move when you draw in most cases you will be dead where you stand!" is a quote I share with everyone attend- ing my officer survival course. Basic patterns of movement are designed to create dis- tance between you and your threat and need to be prac- ticed in conjunction with accessing your gear and draw- ing it. 5 Basic Patterns of Movement: • Lateral Movement (right to left or left to right)—is side-to-side movement is often referred to as "getting off line." e practice is, as you step to the side with your first foot that touches the ground you have already unsnapped your gear from the carrier, and before your movement has stopped you have drawn your gear from your belt. • Backward Movement (stepping to the rear 2-3 steps)— is rearward movement is often referred to as "retreat- ing." e practice is, as you step to the rear and when your first foot touches the ground you have already unsnapped your gear from the carrier, and before your movement has stopped you have drawn your gear from your belt. • Taking the Line Movement (forward off shoulder of subject)—is forward movement is often referred to as "taking the line." e practice is, as you step to the for- ward off shoulder of the subject and when your first foot touches the ground, you have already unsnapped your gear from the carrier, and before your movement has stopped you have drawn your gear from your belt. • "Tactical L" (2-3 steps to the rear and then 3-4 steps lat- erally)—is movement is often referred to as "Tactical L." is tactical movement creates distance by your mov- ing to the rear then immediately moving to the side to get off line. e practice is, as you take your two to three steps to the rear you have already unsnapped your gear from the carrier, and before you begin your movement laterally you have drawn your gear from your belt. • Fading Movement (stepping to the rear at a 45-degree angle off your shoulder)—is movement we refer to as ACCESSING AND DRAWING THE TOOLS ON YOUR BELT Practice drawing tools from your duty belt in different situations, with added distractions, and using different types of movement. PHOTOS: DAVE YOUNG, DIRECTOR OF ARMA TRAINING

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